Open Hands, Open Access (OHOA)

Open Hands, Open Access (OHOA) 2017-12-22T10:07:23+00:00

Registration is now open for the WA Cohort of Open Hands, Open Access.  The 2018 winter/spring series includes the following modules and will run during the specified dates:

February 20 – April 30, 2018:
Module 1: An Overview of Deaf-Blindness and Instructional Strategies
Module 2: The Sensory System, the Brain, and Learning
Module 3: The Role of Interveners in Educational Settings

Module 11: Intervener Strategies (February 20 – March 11, 2018)
Module 13: Calendars (March 12 – April 1, 2018)
Module 14: Introduction to Orientation and Mobility for Interveners (March 19 – April 8, 2018)
Module 15: Orientation and Mobility in Everyday Routines (April 9 – 30, 2018)

Important mentions:
*The WA Cohort is tailored to Washington state and is hosted by Kathee Scoggin, Katie Humes and Sarah Godwin.
*Participants can access modules at their convenience 24/7 during the specified dates.
* A certificate and six clock hours are offered at the completion of each module.

Scroll down to read a complete description of offered modules or REGISTER HERE


February 20 – April 30, 2018:

Module 1: An Overview of Deaf-Blindness and Instructional Strategies

Module 1 gives learners an overall sense of the population of students who are deaf-blind and describes approaches for teaching and interacting with students who are deaf-blind.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify important facts that can be learned from the National Child Count of Children and Youth Who Are Deaf-Blind.
  • Understand the importance of gathering information about a student’s etiology to guide the development of an effective educational plan.
  • Recognize that deaf-blindness is a disability of access to information that results in significant challenges in interactions and learning.
  • Be aware of basic team dynamics

Module 2: The Sensory System, the Brain, and Learning

Module 2 gives learners an overview of the sensory systems and the ways that students access information in the world around them.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the importance of each of the seven senses.
  • Understand the brain-senses connection and its impact on learning.
  • Understand some general strategies for supporting a student’s learning.
  • Understand basic information about all seven senses.
  • Know how to identify additional resources to learn more.

Module 3: The Role of Interveners in Educational Settings

Module 3 orients learners to the role of the intervener and the process of intervention.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Be able to explain the role of an intervener.
  • Understand the Principles of Intervention.
  • Be able to describe intervention as team process.
  • Be aware of basic team dynamics.

Module 11: Intervener Strategies (February 20 – March 11, 2018)

Within this module, the learner delves deeper into the essential role and function of the intervener. Come learn how to refine your observational skills. Learn about the key principles of how to: “do with and not for”; “be a ‘bridge’ not a barrier” for students; use hand-under-hand techniques, and how to apply the techniques of wait time and pacing for processing.

 Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate observation skills that promote understanding of the intervener strategies covered in this module.
  • Describe the principle of “do with not for” and identify ways to “do with” students who are deaf-blind.
  • Describe the challenges of being a bridge, rather than a barrier. Identify possible solutions to these challenges.
  • Explain the importance and rationale of hand-under-hand technique and demonstrate the technique.
  • Understand the importance of “pace, process and wait.”

Module 13: Calendars (March 12 – April 1, 2018)

Calendars for children with deaf-blindness are individualized time pieces that help them make sense of and participate in their environment. Calendars also provide a rich way of accessing information and having conversation. In addition to providing individuals with a sense of safety, they can also provide a way for individuals to share their opinions with others.

 Learning Outcomes

  • Explain why a student with deaf-blindness might have difficulty learning time concepts, time vocabulary, and understanding traditional timepieces.
  • List the continuum of time frames in calendar systems and identify several student characteristics that are prerequisites for each.
  • Identify ways that calendar systems are individualized for students with deaf-blindness.
  • Describe strategies to depict and discuss the past events for each time frame.
  • Describe how calendars move from concrete to abstract across the time frames to teach vocabulary about the future.
  • List example of how calendars support communication for students with deaf-blindness.

Module 14: Introduction to Orientation and Mobility for Interveners (March 19 – April 8, 2018)

Orientation and mobility skills are essential for all people and must be taught directly to students who are deaf-blind. To work effectively with an O&M instructor, an intervener needs to understand the role of O&M and how she can effectively support plans that are created for the student to develop O&M skills.

 Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the role of the intervener in supporting a student’s orientation and mobility.
  • Describe the role of the orientation and mobility specialist.
  • Describe the 5 levels of the Spatiotemporal Development Framework as it relates to students who are deaf-blind.
  • Identify ways to support students who are deaf-blind within the 5 levels of development.
  • Identify basic O&M tools and techniques.

Module 15: Orientation and Mobility in Everyday Routines (April 9 – April 30, 2018)

Part two of the O&M modules takes us to the practical world of O&M in everyday life. Learn more about how interveners provide deeper insight for all team members in the ways that students are motivated to use these skills in the world around them.

 Learning Outcomes

  • Understand how an effective travel routine can support a student’s practice of O&M skills.
  • Understand the “10 Principles of Effective Travel Routines” and how to apply intervener strategies to support student learning related to each principle.
  • Understand how environmental features help a student learn about the concepts of space and distance.
  • Understand how environmental features can be sequenced to help a student know where he or she is in space (orientation).
  • Understand that the skills a student acquires in the context of travel routines have a direct, positive impact on his or her inclusion in family, school, and community life.
  • Understand that the skills acquired in the context of travel routines lead to higher levels of safe, efficient, and independent travel.